Mocha Pro V3 Serial Number Generator

Tracking and rotoscoping are part of almost any visual effects project. For 2D tracking, point trackers are most commonly used, but to get good point tracks requires a mix of experience and luck. You often have to “prime” a clip for optimum tracking using color correctors and other image manipulations. If the point being tracked exits frame, you get into offset tracking, which presents its own set of challenges. If it all fails, you are into hand tracking, which is time consuming and very hard to get accurate. Instead, Imagineer’s Planar Tracker tracks an object’s translation, rotation and scaling data based on the movement of a user-defined plane.

Mocha Pro 5 Plug-in Options Purchase Price Upgrade from Mocha Pro 4 Mocha Pro. Serial number activation: Contact Boris FX Customer Service. A Mocha V3 software with a Mocha V4 code, or have substituted Mocha Pro for Mocha Plus. Host ID and activation code into support for a manual license generation.

A plane is any flat surface having only two dimensions, such as a table top, a wall, or a television screen. Planes provide much more detail to the computer about an object’s translation, rotation and scaling than is possible with point-based tracking tools. Even as an object leaves and enters a frame, there is usually enough information for the Planar Tracker to maintain a solid track of the object. When you work with the Mocha tools, you will need to look for planes in the clip.

More specifically, you will need to look for planes that coincide with movements you want to track. If someone is waving goodbye, you can break their arm into two planes - the upper and lower limbs. Although not all of the points on the arm sections actually lie on the same two-dimensional surface, the apparent parallax will be minimal.

Stereo Support in the Plugin: Most of the plugins now support Stereo, Top/Bottom and Left/Right stereo views. AVX plugins support Top/Bottom and Left/Right. Top/Bottom and Left/Right support in Standalone: the standalone version now supports Top/Bottom and Left/Right stereo modes. Plugin Auto-save: Plugin versions now save a backup of your file at intervals in just in case the host has a problem or you forget to save!. Save the last used Mocha project Open and Export locations: No more tedious hunting for the same directory 100 times!.

Near-object Reorient: You can now properly reorient a shot using near-objects rather than the horizon. Speed improvements to Reorient: We’ve added additional speed increases to render and playback of the Reorient module in Mocha VR. 360° Planar Tracking: Imagineer’s award-winning planar tracking solution has been improved to support equirectangular footage delivering the world’s most robust 360 tracking solution for post-production. 360° Workspace: Optimized workspace and toolset works simultaneously in rectilinear and lat/long views bringing 360 capability to a variety of applications. Artists can easily track and roto without worrying about equirectangular seams or distorted pixels.

360° Masking Tools: Unlimited X-Spline tools for articulate shape creation and masking, saves hours of time versus traditional keyframing techniques. Roto-masks can be rendered back to host or exported to most editing and compositing systems. 360° Object Removal: Mocha’s famous Remove Module now works on 360 video by analyzing temporal frames and “automatically removing” unwanted camera rigs, shadows, crew members and more for massive time savings. Horizon Stabilization: Designed to reduce unstable motion, the new Reorient Module can drastically improve nausea inducing VR experiences by smoothing or stabilizing shaky, handheld and drone captured footage.

Driven by robust planar tracking, a user can even track and stabilize out of focus and most difficult footage. Lens Distort Workflow for 360 Compositing: Plug-in based lens correction workflow converts between lat/long and rectilinear for a simple workflow to add titles, graphics, patches and non 360 enabled filters to your 360 project. Plug-in & Standalone workflows: Running inside industry standard editing and effects applications, provides an immediate bridge for systems that do not currently support 360/VR.

Render finished shots to your timeline OR export tracking and roto data in a variety of formats for flexibility and project sharing. Floating license support for plugins and standalone: You can now run floating licenses for the plugins and the standalone Mocha.

There is no need to used Mocha FL. Render license support for plugins and standalone: You can now use render (i.e. Non-interactive) licenses to expand rendering to other machines. Apply Export for Mocha Pro Plugin in After Effects: You no longer have to rely on the clipboard, you can generate and apply tracking data directly in the plugin interface. Improved GPU Tracker: Additional improvements speed, stability and accuracy. Improved Remove Performance: Improved remove performance, especially when using clean plates.

Improved GPU Tracker: Support for Lens calibration. Additional improvements to card support, speed, stability and accuracy. Customize Preferences with Python: You can now set preferences with Python using a Settings API (Mocha Pro Standalone only). Python Frame Buffer Control: Python mocharender.py and mochaexport.py scripts now accept arguments to turn on and off frame buffers (Mocha Pro Standalone only). Other Python API improvements: (see Python Guide and Mocha Python reference. Mocha Pro Standalone only).

Plugin Version: You can now load Mocha Pro as a plugin into Adobe After Effects, Adobe Premiere and Avid Media Composer and OFX. GPU Tracking: Our advanced planar tracking is now even faster, utilizing the speed of top end graphics cards. Export Shapes to Blackmagic Fusion: You can now export shape data to the clipboard and paste it directly into Fusion.

Export Shapes to Silhouette: You can now export shape data and import it directly into a Silhouette session. Import shapes to Silhouette: You can also import Silhouette projects to Mocha to make round-tripping between software easier. Export tracking data to HitFilm 4 Pro: Previously you could only do this directly in Mocha HitFilm, now you can export from Mocha Pro. Massive Python API updates: Don’t have an exporter you need? Make your own! Python now supports custom exporters and importers, as well as custom tool creation (Mocha Pro standalone only). Built-in Python script editor: You can now experiment inside Mocha or load fully operational scripts into the GUI using our script editor.

Command line rendering and exporting: Utilizing the Python API you can now render and export outside of the Mocha GUI on the command line, taking the load off while you get back to work. Redesigned Insert Module: We have overhauled the insert module to make it easier to navigate and control, including full layer matting. Copy and paste layers and contours to different layers or other projects: Now rather than having to recreate roto elements you can simply copy and paste them inside the layer or outside to a new project. Improved export for Adobe After Effects shapes: Shape exports for After Effects has been modified to paste directly to the playhead like tacking data, without the addtional padding. Manual cache clearing tools for easier disk space management: Using the Clear Cache tools under the edit menu, you can clear global or project caches manually without needing to close the project. Option to choose Marquee or Lasso for selection: Now holding down the mouse button over the selection tool shows you the option of using a marquee or a lasso tool, for easier point selection. At the very top of the interface you have the tools that form the brunt of your time inside Mocha.

New Project: Starts a project wizard for a new clip Open Project: Open a previously saved project Save Project: Save the project Undo: Undo tasks Redo: Redo tasks revoked by Undo Select: Selection tool for splines and points. Hold the button to choose between Marquee selection and Lasso selection. Select Both: Selects both the Inner spline points and the edge points. Hold this button down to select further options (See below) Select Inner: Only selects the inner spline points Select Edge: Only selects the outer edge points Select Auto: Automatically selects between Inner and Edge points Add Point: Tool to add points to the spline Pan: Used to pan the footage in the Viewer Zoom: Used to zoom into footage in the viewer Create X-Spline Layer: Draw a new X-Spline layer Add X-Spline to Layer: Draw an X-spline that is added to the current spline layer. Create Bezier-Spline Layer: Draw a new B-Spline layer Add Bezier-Spline to Layer: Draw a B-spline that is added to the current spline layer. Attach Layer: Used to select a point and drag-lock it to another layer’s spline point.

Useful for lining up individual splines. Rotate: Rotate selection around the axis of the point you click in the viewer Scale: Scale Selection Move: Move selection Transform Tool: Toggles the transform bounding box for manipulating selections. The section under the Layer Controls panel contains the properties for each layer. Layer In/Out frames: Settings to change where the layer turns on and off in the clip Blend mode: Dropdown to add or subtract your spline to the current layer. Invert flips this Insert Clip: Insert a demo clip to preview your track.

You can use one of the defaults or import your own. For preview purposes only Matte Clip: Replaces the current layer splines with a matte clip. Link to Track: Which layer’s track to link your layer splines to. Can also be set to None. Link to adjusted track: Optional checkbox to link the layer splines to the adjusted track of the selection in “Link to Track”. Mono: This is the default option and works with standard (non-stereo) footage. Stereo (Separate eyes): This takes two separate footage streams.

When chosen, the option to choose another source for the right eye is enabled. If you are using the 'Stereo' option, you will need to select the 'Stereo Output' view (Left or Right) that you want to apply output to. Top/Bottom: Top/Bottom is also commonly known as 'Over/Under'. When used, Mocha will split the footage exactly in half horizontally and use the Top and Bottom halves for each eye. The output to the host will automatically double up to the split views. Left/Right: Left/Right is also commonly known as 'Side by Side'.

When used, Mocha will split the footage exactly in half vertically and use the Left and Right halves for each eye. The output to the hosr will automatically double up to the split views. Nuke: Nuke has native OFX stereo support and so only requires one Source input if you are using the 'Stereo' option. If you have separate left and right eye sources, apply a 'Join Views' node to combined them and feed the output into the Source input of the Mocha node. Vegas Pro: Vegas Pro also has native stereo support. You will only see two options: Mono and Stereo. The 'Stereo' option will read the native set up and feed in both eyes to the Mocha GUI.

Media Composer: Avid’s native stereo support is not supported by Mocha at present, so you can only use Top/Bottom or Left/Right combined stereo files. This then becomes exactly like working in the standalone version of Mocha, with a few exceptions. First, you will notice you don’t need to set up a project like in the standalone version. The source layer is automatically loaded and ready to track in the view.

Secondly you don’t need to save out a project file (unless you want to export it). You just close and save the Mocha view when done and the project is saved inside the Effect like any other Adobe effect.

For further details on how to use anything inside the Mocha GUI, see the rest of the User Guide!. View Matte: Show the black and white matte from the Mocha layers chosen.

This is very useful if you want to just see any problems with the matte, or you want to use the output as a track matte. Apply Matte: Applies the chosen mattes to the current layer,. Visible Layers: This button launches the Visible Layers dialog so you can select the layers you want visible as mattes.

Shape: This drop down lets you switch between All Visible and All mattes. All Visible mattes are controlled by the Visible Layers dialog.

Feather: Applies a blur to the matte. This feathering is independent of the feathering of the individual layers inside Mocha. Invert Mask: Inverts the currently visible mattes. Create AE Mask: Creates native AE splines on the effect layer just like 'Paste Mocha mask'. This function is only available in After Effects. This then becomes exactly like working in the standalone version of Mocha, with a few exceptions. Firstly, you will notice you don’t need to set up a project like in the standalone version.

The source layer is automatically loaded and ready to track in the view. Secondly you don’t need to save out a project file (unless you want to export it). You just close and save the Mocha view when done and the project is saved inside the Effect like any other Adobe effect.

For further details on how to use anything inside the Mocha GUI, see the rest of the User Guide!. View Matte: Show the black and white matte from the Mocha layers chosen. This is very useful if you want to just see any problems with the matte, or you want to use the output as a track matte. Apply Matte: Applies the chosen mattes to the current layer,.

Visible Layers: This button launches the Visible Layers dialog so you can select the layers you want visible as mattes. Shape: This drop down lets you switch between All Visible and All mattes. All Visible mattes are controlled by the Visible Layers dialog.

Feather: Applies a blur to the matte. This feathering is independent of the feathering of the individual layers inside Mocha. Invert Mask: Inverts the currently visible mattes. This then becomes exactly like working in the standalone version of Mocha, with a few exceptions. Firstly, you will notice you don’t need to set up a project like in the standalone version. The source layer is automatically loaded and ready to track in the view.

Secondly you don’t need to save out a project file (unless you want to export it). You just close and save the Mocha view when done and the project is saved inside the Effect like any other AVX effect.

For further details on how to use anything inside the Mocha GUI, see the rest of the User Guide!. View Matte: Show the black and white matte from the Mocha layers chosen. This is very useful if you want to just see any problems with the matte, or you want to use the output as a track matte. Apply Matte: Applies the chosen mattes to the current layer,. Visible Layers: This button launches the Visible Layers dialog so you can select the layers you want visible as mattes.

Visible Layers Dropdown: This drop down lets you switch between All Visible and All mattes. All Visible mattes are controlled by the Visible Layers dialog. Feather: Applies a blur to the matte. This feathering is independent of the feathering of the individual layers inside Mocha.

Invert Matte: Inverts the currently visible mattes. Select any additional source you want to use as an insert in Mocha and plug it into the 'Insert' input (See below.).

Launch the Mocha UI using the button at the top of the panel. This will load a full version of the Mocha interface that you can use just like the standalone version.

Use Mocha as required and then close and save. No rendering is required inside Mocha unless you want to. Choose whether you want to use mattes, renders or any other exported data from Mocha back in the plugin interface. This then becomes exactly like working in the standalone version of Mocha, with a few exceptions. Firstly, you will notice you don’t need to set up a project like in the standalone version. The source layer is automatically loaded and ready to track in the view.

Secondly you don’t need to save out a project file (unless you want to export it). You just close and save the Mocha view when done and the project is saved inside the effect.

For further details on how to use anything inside the Mocha GUI, see the rest of the User Guide!. View Matte: Show the black and white matte from the Mocha layers chosen.

This is very useful if you want to just see any problems with the matte, or you want to use the output as a track matte. Apply Matte: Applies the chosen mattes to the source node. Visible Layers Button: This button launches the Visible Layers dialog so you can select the layers you want visible as mattes. Visible layers Dropdown: This drop down lets you switch between All Visible and All mattes. All Visible mattes are controlled by the Visible Layers dialog.

Feather: Applies a blur to the matte. This feathering is independent of the feathering of the individual layers inside Mocha. Invert Matte: Inverts the currently visible mattes. View Matte: Show the black and white matte from the Mocha layers chosen.

This is very useful if you want to just see any problems with the matte, or you want to use the output as a track matte. Apply Matte: Applies the chosen mattes to the source node. Visible Layers Button: This button launches the Visible Layers dialog so you can select the layers you want visible as mattes. Visible layers Dropdown: This drop down lets you switch between All Visible and All mattes. All Visible mattes are controlled by the Visible Layers dialog. Feather: Applies a blur to the matte.

This feathering is independent of the feathering of the individual layers inside Mocha. Invert Matte: Inverts the currently visible mattes.

This ensures that ImagePrinter will work with any Windows application that provides a print function. Pro 5 shake. ImagePrinter also adopts the universal printer driver user interface that is supported by the Windows platform.

By default, any spline you draw is linked to the tracking data of the layer it is currently in. In hierarchical terms, the spline is the child of the track, even if there is no tracking data. When you begin to track a layer, the area of detail contained within the spline(s) you have drawn will be searched for in the next frame.

If the planar tracker finds the same area in a following frame, it will tell the tracker to move to that point. Because the spline is linked to the track by default, it will also move along with it and the search begins again for the next frame. Select one of the spline tools to create a shape around the outside edge of the area you wish to track.

Start creating your shape by clicking onto the screen. After the third point, the shape will auto-close, but you can continue to add points. When drawing splines it is best to keep the shape not tight on the edge, but actually give a little space to allow for the high contrast edges to show through, as these provide good tracking data. Right-click to finish drawing. If you are using the X-Spline tool you can adjust the handles at each point by pulling them out to create a straight cornered edge, or pull them in to make them more curved.

Right clicking a handle will adjust all the handles in the spline at once. Large Motion: This is the default. It searches for motion and optimizes the track as it goes. Small Motion is also applied when you choose Large Motion. Small Motion: This only optimizes. You would use Small Motion if there were very subtle changes in the movement of the object you are tracking.

Manual Tracking: This is only necessary to use when the object you are tracking is completely obscured or becomes untrackable. Usually used when you need to make some adjustments to complete the rest of the automated tracking successfully. Horizontal/Vertical: The distance of pixels in the footage to search for the next object position. This is set to Auto by default. Angle: If you have a fast rotating object, like a wheel, you can set an angle of rotation to help the tracker to lock onto the detail correctly. The tracker will handle a small amount of rotation, less than 10º per frame, with Angle set to zero.

Zoom: If you have a fast zoom, you can add a percentage value here to help the tracker. Again, the tracker will still handle a small amount of zoom with this set to zero. Track a static area of the shot using Translation, Scale and Rotation only. You don’t want to track a moving object within the shot as this will throw off the stabilization.

Once tracked, switch to the Stabilization tool. Choose which fields of motion you wish to stabilize in the Smooth parameters. By default, translation is automatically selected. In many cases you may only be interested in position stabilization, but hand-held cameras can introduce scale and rotation jitter as well. Adjust the number of frames you want to look for jitter over. A small amount of frames will look for tiny adjustments in the overall motion, whereas bigger values in this field will adjust larger ranges of motion. If there is a significant amount of motion being stabilized and you are losing a lot of your picture in some frames, try fixing those frames by adding them to the Frame List on the left.

Mocha will then interpolate the stabilization between these fixed frames. Track the area you want to lock down using whichever of the motion parameters you require.

Tracking perspective also works for this technique. Once tracked, switch to the Stabilization tool. Choose which fields of motion you wish to lock down in the Smooth parameters. By default, translation is automatically selected. If you want to completely lock down everything, just choose the “All Motion” checkbox. Adjust the number of frames you want to use to look for stabilization. A small amount of frames will look for tiny adjustments in the overall motion, whereas bigger values in this field will adjust larger ranges of motion.

Again, if you want to completely lock down everything for all motion, choose the “Maximum Smoothing” option. When you play back the timeline you will see the rest of the footage warp and move around your locked off area. There is no such thing as a perfect matte. Rotoscoping is an art form that takes into account the background image, the movement of the object, and the new elements to be composited in the background. Try to start your shape at its most complex point in time, where it will need the most control points. Break a complex shape into multiple simple shapes.

If you are rotoscoping a humanoid form and an arm becomes visible, consider rotoscoping the arm as its own element, rather than adding extra points on the body that will serve no purpose when the arm is obscured. Imagine you are the animator who created the shot. What would your dope sheet look like? No matter the medium, whether CG, live action or otherwise, most movements are rarely linear.

They normally move in arcs; they normally accelerate in and out of stopped positions. Try and understand the mechanics behind how things are moving in your shot. This will help you to minimize keyframes. Watch and study the shot before you start working.

Where are the changes in directions? These will normally have keyframes. Where are the starts and stops? Are there camera moves that can be stabilized to make your work easier?. Don’t be afraid to trash your work and start over. Beginning roto artists often make the mistake of trying to fix a flawed approach by adding more and more keyframes.

Experienced roto artists learn to quickly identify an inferior approach and are unashamed to trash their work and start over, often many, many times. It is very difficult to get a good matte without a conscious effort to keep the keyframes to a minimum. Turn on the grid so you can see how the planes are moving.

Adjust the surface to fit the planar perspective if you need to see this movement more accurately. Set any parameters you need for the track and begin tracking. If you lose the track due to obstructions or the object moving off screen, stop the track and create another shape to continue tracking. The second shape will need to start further back in time than where the first one stopped tracking, so their tracking information overlaps on the timeline.

This will help the solver blend together the tracking information of multiple shapes. Once you have tracked the shot, switch to the Camera Solve tab. Select all tracked layers you wish to use for the solve. Choose either Auto to let Mocha guess the right solve, or choose Small Parallax from the drop-down.

If you select Small Parallax, set the focal length. Most commonly this will be 35-70mm. You can choose more than one if the focal length changes. Also choose Zooming if the is any camera zoom in the shot.

Once you have chosen your settings, click Solve. Locate planar areas in the shot that can be tracked. These objects should not be moving in the shot, so choose areas like walls, ground, tree trunks etc. Turn on the grid so you can see how the planes are moving.

Adjust the surface to fit the planar perspective if you need to see this movement more accurately. Set any parameters you need for the track and begin tracking. If you lose the track due to obstructions or the object moving off screen, stop the track and create another shape to continue tracking.

The second shape will need to start further back in time than where the first one stopped tracking, so their tracking information overlaps on the timeline. This will help the solver blend together the tracking information of multiple shapes.

Once you have tracked the shot, switch to the Camera Solve tab. Select all tracked layers you wish to use for the solve.

Choose either Auto to let Mocha guess the right solve, or choose Large Parallax from the drop-down. If you select Large Parallax, set the focal length. Most commonly this will be 35-70mm. You can choose more than one if the focal length changes. Also choose Zooming if the is any camera zoom in the shot.

Once you have chosen your settings, click Solve. Check the Solve Quality bar to make sure the solve has been accurate. Make sure your planar tracks are accurate and locked on well to their static objects. Check that there is enough overlapping frames in the layers if you have had to do more than one track along the timeline. If you start one track exactly where the last finished, the solver may not be able to accurately blend the resulting data. You may not have enough layers tracked to get an accurate solve. Try adding further tracks to help the solve.

Try a different solve type. Sometimes one solver may give better results than another. Try a different focal length.

Apply a manual corner pin to your insert layer in After Effects and place it in the desired position for any frame. On this frame, Precompose the layer and make sure all attributes are inside it. You will now have a precomposed layer that is the same dimensions as the tracked footage. In Mocha, go to the same frame in the footage you applied the corner pin to in After Effects and select the track.

On this frame, turn on your surface and click 'Align Surface' in the Layer Properties panel. You will see the surface fit to the full dimensions of the footage. Export this newly aligned track to After Effects corner pin.

Back in After Effects, select the precomposed layer and paste the data. To export stereo tracking data from Mocha:. Select a layer. Click 'Export Tracking Data​' from the Track module or choose the option from the file menu (File Export Tracking Data​). Select the Application you wish to export to. Select the view you want to export (or check 'Export all views' if it is available for that export format).

Choose whether you want to export the currently selected layer, all visible layers or all layers. Click 'Copy to Clipboard' or 'Save' depending on your preference. Note that some exports only allow you to save the data.

To export stereo Shape data from Mocha:. Select a layer. Click 'Export Shape Data​' from the Track module or choose the option from the file menu ( File Export Shape Data​). Select the Application you wish to export to. Select the view you want to export (or check 'Export all views' if it is available for that export format).

Choose whether you want to export the currently selected layer, all visible layers or all layers. Click 'Copy to Clipboard' or 'Save' depending on your preference. Note that some exports only allow you to save the data. To understand how Mocha Pro removes a foreground object consider how you would do it yourself. A common method is to select a source image where the foreground object does not obscure the background region you are trying to paint in the target frame.

You would then clone or otherwise copy the pixels from the source frame to the target frame. If the background is not in the same position in the two frames you would have to track the patch of pixels into the frame, and if the lighting is different between the two frames you would have to adjust the brightness of the patch. The remove module attempts to do this for you automatically using a method called motion keying. As it has tracked the background areas you have defined, it can move pixels of these background areas from one frame to another.

Hence, if a part of a background area is obscured in one frame, Mocha Pro can search the rest of the clip for a frame where the obscured background area is visible, and move the pixels correctly into the target frame. During this process Mocha Pro will evaluate and compensate for the lighting differences between the source and the target frame. As the tracker computes the motion of planar objects in the scene, you get the best results if the background is planar, or it has been subdivided into planar elements. Otherwise you might see artifacts.

If Mocha Pro cannot track the background accurately you will probably get artifacts. If your selection of the background includes objects that move differently to the background this can reduce the accuracy of the computed motion. If your selection of the background includes parts of the foreground objects then this can cause problems for the tracker as it will compute a motion for the background that is influence by the movement of the foreground.

This may also cause artifacts when the removal is performed. If the background contains e.g. A waterfall or another object that changes appearance from frame to frame, you will most likely get artifacts if you try to remove a foreground object that moves across such a background.

Mocha Pro will not know how to handle the changes. Another cause of such artifacts is moving specular reflections. By default the Preview option is switched on. This means that the selected (highlighted) cleanplate will be shown in the display window. The current frame viewed on the timeline is also changed to the selected cleanplate frame. When Preview is switched off, the view switches back to the clip you are viewing. Click on the File name or Frame Number for any cleanplate to change the selection.

The Preview option allows you to select the correct frame number for your cleanplate(s). If you import a single cleanplate, the frame number will be listed as “All”. This means that the cleanplate will be used for all the frames of the clip. Use this option if the camera is locked off. Change “All” to a particular frame if want to change this behavior and track the cleanplate from the specified frame into the other frames. If part of the missing background has not been found anywhere in the clip, and the foreground object therefore cannot be completely removed, Flood Fill can be switched on to fill the remaining region using a flood fill method.

This is especially useful when it is the matte you are interested in, as you then don’t care too much about the quality of the removal but require that the foreground object is completely removed to avoid holes in the matte. The Smoothing Level should be increased if you result is not as smooth as it should be or there are temporal variations in the results. To render a remove in stereo:. Track the background in both views with a layer as outlined in 'Stereo Tracking' above. Mask out and animate the foreground object you want to remove.

You will need to check to make sure the object is correctly covered by the layer in both views. Make sure the foreground layer is above the background layer in the layer controls. Adjust your remove parameters (See the full User Guide for details on Remove parameters).

If it is not already on, press the 'Operate in all views' button on the right side of the render buttons. Remember that you can only remove an object if the background behind it is also tracked.

Track the background layer(s) before removing a foreground object. Check that the object is inside the selection contour in every frame. If it isn’t, move the control points outwards as necessary to completely enclose the object. Use linking forwards/backwards to apply changes to the contour in multiple frames. Check whether the relative motion of the foreground and background layers is sufficient to see “behind” the whole of the foreground object. Mocha Pro only needs to see the background in one frame to achieve good results. If more images are available in the clip, track the selections over a few more images.

This may provide Mocha Pro with the extra information it needs. Try pulling the selection contour closer to the edge of the object. This will provide Mocha Pro with extra background pixels. This may be due to inaccurate tracking of the background. If you think this is possible, see the above hints on improving the tracking.

If the tracking accuracy cannot be improved, increase the Dissolve Width. This will dissolve the patches into the original image and reduce the tearing artifacts.

For small foreground objects such as wires, in front of a non-planar background, switch on 3D Compensation. This will attempt to model the effect of the varying 3D depth of the background. If there is more than one background selection behind the foreground selection, special treatment of the boundary between them is often required. If the background layers are joined, such as a wall and floor selection, use the Attach Layers tool to join them together and avoid artifacts at the boundary. If they are moving independently, you need to adjust the boundary in the front background selection to accurately delineate the boundary between the two background selections. Set your input clip and your calibration clip.

These can be the same if there are obvious distorted lines in your input clip, but you can also opt to use a Grid Image (see Using Grid Images). Use the Locate Lines button to find the straight lines in your calibration clip. Adjust the Min Line Length if needed.

Click the new line button (Or press N on your keyboard) and click on line segments to define what should be straight lines. Every time you need to define a new line, make sure you click on the button again or press N.

Once you have defined enough lines, click on the Calibration dropdown and select a camera model (Usually 1-Parameter or 2-Parameter). If you are calibrating with a grid, choose Equidistant Lines. Click the Calibrate button. To check the distortion, turn on your grid. This is a way to re-name a distortion setting if you want to have more than one distortion applied. You can choose to leave the input clip intact and create a new clip containing the output from the Lens module, and then rename the rendered distorted or undistorted file and carry on working. Just select the clip from the pulldown menu and select the New​ button to name the new clip.

The new clip will be the same as the current output if you choose to select that it inherits the attributes of that output clip. To select which lines you want to use for calibrating the distortion, select the New Line button each time you want to select an entirely new line. Select one or more line segments lying on the same line in the scene by placing the cursor over each segment and selecting them.

As you hover over the lines the currently closest line will be highlighted in red to indicate which line will be selected. As you add more segments, the completed line is rendered so that you can check for mistakes. Each line you select will be colored differently to clarify the groupings of the line segments. Try to choose lines that exhibit the most distortion, typically those reaching towards the edge of the image, and not pointing towards the center. Try also to achieve good coverage of the whole image, because otherwise the distortion may only be computed correctly in the part of the image where the lines are chosen. If you select a line segment incorrectly, click on it again to deselect it.

If only a small amount of distortion is present in the images, choose the 1-Parameter radial distortion model. Then press the Calibrate button. This will find the optimal value for the radial distortion parameter to straighten the selected lines. You can use the 2-Parameter radial distortion model if the 1-Parameter model doesn’t capture all the distortion in the image.

This distortion model is often used when there is a wave or irregularity in the lens. Anamorphic can be used for any lens with Anamorphic or different vertical and horizontal distortion. Distortion Map is only used with Distortion Maps and is not related to line-selection based calibration (see below). Equirectangular (available in Mocha VR) will automatically set and calibrate the lens to standard Equirectangular lens format and needs no further calibration. See the section above for more details.

Mocha Lens for After Effects: This format is used exclusively with the Mocha Lens plugin for After Effects, which you can download separately from the Imagineer Systems Website. Distortion Map (Mocha Pro/VR only): A renderable Distortion map to use in supported applications, such as Nuke. Imagineer Lens Data (Mocha Pro/VR only): You can export the lens parameters in a simple XML file format by selecting the Export Lens Data. The parameters are written in a resolution-independent way. The focal distance and image center x/y are represented as multiples of the image width and height. The distortion parameters are written directly.

They are defined in the later section called “For the technically minded”. The dimensions of the distortion map will be automatically calculated at a larger size to your footage to make sure there is enough overscan for correct distortion. The frame range is automatically set to only render 1 frame unless you have an animated distortion.

Choose whether you want to render a map to Undistort or Distort with the radio buttons on the right. Choose a destination folder for the image.

Distortion maps must be 32 bit floats, so TIF or DPX will be the best options. Click 'Save'. Load the Distortion Map into the program of your choice. To adjust the ROI aspect ratio to match that of the background image given its current position and shape in the background image, click on Fit ROI to Surface. Conversely, the Fit Surface to ROI button moves the surface position to match the aspect ratio of the insert image, given its ROI settings.

These controls will work best if you are in a frame where the insert is as front-on as possible. For them to work correctly, the pixel aspect ratio of both the input clip and insert clip must be correct. A common issue is that if the resolution of either clip was not recognized when the clip was imported, it is assigned the PAL camera type. This often does not give the correct pixel aspect ratio. To check this, switch to the Camera tool and select each clip in turn, checking the appearance on the screen to make sure that each clip appears correct on the screen. If not, change the Film Type. If you know that the pixel aspect ratio of the clip is one (square pixels) select Custom as the Film Type and set the pixel aspect ratio to one.

The number fields are positioned in the menu to relate to the edge of the ROI that they adjust. So, to reduce the height of the insert ROI at the top of the frame, decrease the value in the top ROI number field by dragging or highlighting the current value and typing in a new value. Similarly, to reduce the height of the insert ROI at the bottom of the frame, increase the value in the bottom number field by dragging or highlighting the current value and typing in a new value. The same applies for the left and right edges of the frame with the left and right number fields. Open the Mocha GUI and set your footage to Equirectangular mode in the Lens module.

Close and save Mocha. Set your view using the VR lens parameters in the plugin interface. Copy the current Mocha effect. If necessary, Nest/precomp the rendered lens patch.

You must precomp in After Effects for the next steps to work correctly. Paste the original effect back on top of the nested comp. Choose Lens: Distort from the 'Module' drop down in the pasted effect to restore the warp back to its original position. Merge/layer the final result back on top of your original footage.

Track a layer(s) for the stabilization (see step 1 above!). Move to the Reorient module. This will turn on the 'View Horizon' checkbox, which shows the red horizon line on screen. It will also disable Preview so you can work with the original clip.

+. Adjust the red horizon line to fit your horizon using the column “Horizon Align”. You can do this in either 360 mode or in Equirectangular mode. We recommend Equirectangular mode, as it is much easier to see the whole horizon. If you would prefer a visual control, you can turn on “Show Control” under the Horizon Align rotation fields.

The frame rate, aspect ratio and dimensions are the same as the original footage. If you are creating proxy footage, make sure the aspect ratio and frame rate are the same. If you are using a particular bit depth, make sure you convert to the same depth if you are using the footage for rendering inside Mocha. If using compressed footage, don’t set the compression too low, as this will create artifacts that may hinder tracking and roto. Make sure Mocha supports the sequence you are converting to!

+mocha arguments file​ + Table 1. Arguments -in frame Specifies an in-point frame for your footage. The frame value is zero-indexed, so all in points assume a base of 0. For example, If your frames start at 250 and you want to begin at 261, you would type mocha -in 12 myFootage.mov. A 0.5 value will let you set on the second field in interlaced footage, for example: mocha -in 12.5 -out frame Specifies an out-point frame for your footage. The frame value is zero-indexed, so all out points assume a base of 0.

For example, If your frames start at 250 and you want to end at 261, you would type mocha -out 12 myFootage.mov. A 0.5 value will let you set on the second field in interlaced footage, for example: mocha -in 12.5 -frame-rate fps Set the frame rate for the imported footage. For example mocha -frame-rate 24 myFootage.mov -par par Set the Pixel Aspect Ratio for the imported footage. For example mocha -par 0.5 myFootage.mov -interlace-mode mode Set the interlacing mode for field ordering and pulldown for the imported footage. For example mocha -interlace-mode 1 myFootage.mov See Table 18.2 below for interlace mode codes.

Open Mocha and choose 'Activate' from the welcome screen or 'Licensing' from the help menu. Fill out the registration details on the main page. Paste the serial number into the available activation field and click 'Next'. Your details will appear on the next page.

Click 'Alternative Activation' to install the license. An Unique Product ID code will appear. Copy this code and send it to the customer support contacts listed in the dialog:. Your license should install automatically and Mocha will close.

Reopen Mocha to start using your licensed version!. It is important that your Mocha software matches your activation code, so check your purchase order to make sure everything matches up version wise.

It may be that you don’t have the correct version of Mocha installed from our download section. This is especially important for legacy software before V5, where a different licensing method is used. If you are attempting to install via a terminal instead of directly on the machine itself and you are having trouble getting Mocha to install, try installing directly on the machine.

Check to make sure you are not restricted to using certain ports due to a firewall or other admin permissions. When in doubt, temporarily turn your firewalls off for the duration of the installation and then turn them back on when you are done. Troubleshoot your machine; try uninstalling all your Mocha software, restarting your machine, and installing the software again from scratch, and make sure you follow installation directions off our website exactly. It sounds redundant, but sometimes it’s a great way to figure out what is going on inside your machine. If all else fails, our support team is happy to help you figure this out.

Please contact support!. The manager will install the license file here: /etc/opt/isl/licences. If you have requested to receive your license by e-mail, copy your License file (e.g. Mocha.lic) into /etc/opt/isl/licences.

Skip this step if you have used your activation code to install the server license instead. The server process should already be started automatically, but you can make sure by typing: /etc/init.d/isllmgrd start. The server will start automatically at runlevels 2, 3, 4 and 5. FLEXlm messages are logged to: /var/log/isllmgrd.log. The init script accepts start, stop, restart and status commands, and also reread, which rereads the License file.

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The daemon is run by default as the nobody user. If this does not exist on your system, either create it or edit the script to use a different non-root user.